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The Exhausted Teacher’s Guide to a Rejuvenating Summer Break

When you are a teacher at the end of the school year, it can be hard to put one foot in front of the other. You so badly want to be DONE already, but you still feel that pressure to pull off incredibly engaging and meaningful year-end activities. It’s no wonder that burn out is common this time of year. I totally get it. I, too, was a teacher before becoming a therapist. I remember the burnout, the exhaustion, and the PRESSURE. I am grateful for my colleagues who would remind me that teachers pack a full year of work into 9 months! We are understandably exhausted by the end of it. It makes total sense. You deserve a real break this summer, a time to fully recharge. I find that if you use this time to address sources of     . . . read more

Make Lasting Memories this Mother’s Day

As we approach Mother’s Day, I want to take a moment to reflect on spirit of this holiday which exists beyond the greeting cards and the Sunday brunches. My daughter is 7 this year, and I’ve been searching for ways to help this holiday bring lasting and meaningful memories for both of us. Recently, I attended a spiritual enrichment group that I meet with twice a month. The theme for this week was our grandparents. The group searched for memories of their grandparents as we talked. Some of the stories were heart-warming, others were marked with sadness and loss. As the meeting progressed, I had the opportunity to reflect on my experiences with my own grandparents, particularly my grandmother. One thing that surfaced was my experience of her being a kindred spirit for me. She was a strong, resilient and     . . . read more

Spotlight on Laura Watters, LCPC

Laura Watters, LCPC joined New Approaches last fall and has quickly shown herself to be an absolute rockstar therapist. I sat down with her to talk more about her approach and why she is so darned popular with clients. Here’s what she had to say: How would you describe your style to a potential client? Clients say that I’m personable and have a warm conversational style. I want the space to be open and welcoming for you. I want you to feel comfortable talking about the hard stuff. That takes courage and I’m here to provide the support. It’s all about us collaborating, bringing together your wisdom and life experience with my guidance and direction. That will keep your process moving forward. Tell us about your areas of specialty. I have been in several roles over the last 10 years and     . . . read more

Meet Mallory!

We are very pleased to announce that we now have a fabulous intern, Mallory Zwerdling! A message from Mallory: “As your counselor my greatest desire is to understand your unique circumstances and help you reach a place of personal fulfillment. My style is client-centered, interpersonal and solution focused. I believe that by joining you in whatever space you are in, sometimes as a companion and sometimes as a guide, together we can discover meaning behind experiences, thoughts behind behavior, and cultivate the growth needed to get you your desired outcomes. With years of experience surrounding domestic violence, homelessness and disability, I am no stranger to assisting people as they learn to navigate life’s most trying tribulations. Holding a bachelors degree in psychology and sociology, and having completed all master’s degree coursework for clinical mental health counseling, I am now accepting     . . . read more

3 Ways to Practice Positive Parenting

Parenting is a beautiful, rewarding, and challenging undertaking. It’s easy to second guess yourself as a parent, and you sometimes wonder if you are doing all you can to give your child the love and guidance she needs. The good news is that we all have the tools we need to be positive parents. The key to unlocking them is found through awareness of the impact the parent-child relationship holds for your child. Here are three key areas to consider when cultivating a positive parenting approach. The relationship with your child. Children develop through relationship. Everything that a child learns and internalizes is based on this. A newborn infant does not understand that he is a separate entity from his mother. The developmental task of a child’s first three years of life is to gain a sense of psychological “separateness”     . . . read more

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