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The Senselessness of Stigma

Today I have the honor of having my guest post The Senselessness of Stigma featured on Growing Up Chaotic. Growing Up Chaotic is a blog dedicated to “Hope and guidance with a modern kick on how to survive growing up chaotic.” When creator, Dawn Clancy, told me that there has been a lot of talk about mental health stigma on her blog, I knew it was a topic I needed to write about. I’m very interested in adding to the conversation and showing how stigma is both problematic and, well, senseless. (click here to read the post).

IMG_9759Dawn contributed a fabulous piece recently, Emotions and the Binge – How I Learned to Sit With Discomfort, for the New Perspectives Series on this blog. Dawn also has a radio program, Growing Up Chaotic Live, where I was a guest talking about EMDR a couple of months ago. Dawn asked a lot of great questions, and this episode is a great resource for people who are interested in learning more about EMDR.

There is so much going on over at Growing Up Chaotic, I hope you will check it out, subscribe to the blog and follow along with the radio program.

Over here at New Approaches, I’ve also been working to collect feedback on how to make support and education around emotional wellness more attractive and accessible. I’ve even created a survey to get some information (so if you haven’t already please go ahead and take it- it’s anonymous and about 2 minutes long). There is a lot of positive energy around challenging stigma, feeling feelings, and breaking down barriers to being emotionally well around here!

Thanks for all the support and feedback- together we can show that stigma is senseless.

 

POSTED: 18 Jun, 2013

TAGS: emotional wellness , mental health , perspectives , psychotherapy , therapy , wellness , worthiness

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2 responses to “The Senselessness of Stigma”

  1. The post was great, Hannah! I love how you diagnose people as “human.”

  2. Hannah says:

    Thanks, Jennifer. I do really think of people as human first and foremost. People are complicated and a diagnosis only goes so far to explain a person’s situation.

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